Top Five Things I’ll Miss About Sydney

Sydney skylineYesterday, I bid adieu to Sydney, hopped on a plane and scooted over to Singapore. I was struggling to finish all my uni assignments until the last minute (that’s something I won’t miss), so unsurprisingly I didn’t get a chance to fully reflect upon my amazing Aussie experience until now.

I was so busy over the last four months exploring the East Coast, meeting the most amazing people, sun bathing, kangaroo-spotting (but in vain) and attempting to become a better journalist, that I may have skipped on actively counting my blessings, so here we go: the Top Five Things I’ll Miss About Sydney list (in no particular order).

Access to the beach

Not that I strongly believe in the Zodiac, but being a water sign must explain my affinity for wanting to wade in open waters despite being an average (read: comical) swimmer. [PS: Remember this?] While Canadian lakes will always be my first love, it was joyous having the beach at your doorstep. I lived at Coogee Beach, which in my very biased opinion is the best beach among the Eastern suburbs, but IF one ever gets bored of Coogee, then there are so many other beaches and bays to bathe in. Read about my favourite ones hereContinue reading

Settling down in Sydney

I have become a true nomad. After I arrived in Sydney last Thursday, it took me less than 24 hours to get a phone plan, understand public transit, attend a lecture at my university, and also manage to check out the Sydney Opera House. Sleeping for most part of my 22-hour journey helped me adapt to the new timezone, so when I got to Australia I was already in full “time-to-re-settle” mode. My new roommates seem to have just given up hope that jet lag will eventually take me down and I’ll stop being a whirlwind of an explorer, but I don’t think it’s me; it’s Sydney! This city has so much life, energy and enthusiasm that an extrovert like me can’t help but feed off it.

I have been here for a week and I must admit, I feel quite at home. I am living in the beach neighbourhood of Coogee with awesome roommates (sorry, flatmates) who pick me up from the airport and build me IKEA furniture. Our apartment is at top of a hill and the view is just stunning. Check it out:

Coogee

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Documenting the Documentary

For my last semester of Journalism school at Ryerson University, I only had two courses: the very theoretical Journalism Law and Ethics; and the very practical, challenging, exciting and awesome course called TV Documentary.

TV Documentary is a fourth year destination course for broadcast journalism students. Students not taking this course can choose between Radio Doc, Senior Reporting, Advanced Photojournalism and other courses that require individual effort. TV Doc, on the other hand, is all about team work. Students are divided into a team of five and choose their roles within the team.

My group consisted of the amazing Joseph Casciaro, our Producer who was responsible for overseeing the entire process; my very talented best friend, Sachin Seth, was the reporter for this project; Phoenix Tarampi, who I interned with earlier at Daily Planet, was the cinematographer; and Christine Fitzgerald was the senior researcher. Just as I had wanted, I was the editor of the documentary.

As painful as it sounds, locking yourself and editing a piece is actually one of the funnest things I got to do at Ryerson. And this is the part: When you work on something, for say a few hours, and bring in your team members to the edit suite to show them what you put together, and they like it – that’s such a rewarding feeling! On the last day of class, our professor also mentioned that editing really helps shape the final product, making it a very important part of the process.

And I am happy that I got to see this piece from start to finish. I had pitched the idea of doing a story about the men who get mail order brides: what are they like? why do they choose an international marriage service to get a wife? what kind of backgrounds do they come from? Continue reading